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Computational linguistics

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The Department of Computational Linguistics deals with theoretical and applied research in the field of natural language processing (NLP).

A main goal of the Department of Computational Linguistics is the development of efficient theoretical models and language technologies implemented within state-of-the-art computer applications and systems.

 

 

The Department of Computational Linguistics carries out theoretical and applied research in the field of natural language processing (NLP). The main directions of scientific study cover:

  • theoretical problems of the formal description of natural languages,
  • morphological, syntactic and semantic analysis,
  • electronic dictionaries,
  • ontologies and semantic relations,
  • corpus linguistics,
  • document categorisation and annotation,
  • information extraction and information retrieval,
  • part-of-speech, syntactic, and word sense disambiguation,
  • machine translation,
  • etc.

Our current research priorities are oriented towards automatic word-sense disambiguation and the problems of machine translation.

DCL has at its disposal large coverage language resources – dictionaries, lexical-semantic data bases, corpora, as well as highly-performing computer applications for language data processing.

The Department of Computational Linguistics has attracted highly-qualified young professionals from different fields of knowledge – linguists, computer scientists, mathematicians, logicians. The interdisciplinary research carried out at DCL has brought about the establishment of a continuous cooperation with leading professionals working in different scientific fields.

The research team of the Department of Computational Linguistics was granted First place Scholarly Achievements Award and a diploma by the National Science Fund for attaining significant results in the development of the research project Verb Semantics – problems of the Interface (28 December 2005).